Donald trump is a broken man

For the most part, this board's a free for all. Don't say I didn't warn you...
learnin
Moderator
Posts: 12505
Joined: September 18th, 2013, 1:41 pm
Has thanked: 7 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: Donald trump is a broken man

Post by learnin » August 2nd, 2020, 2:45 am

RichardZ wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 6:40 pm
So, let me get this straight....

Someone can say the president has a 'disordered brain' and the president has a 'mental illness', but cannot say, without reprimand,..... 'Dementia Joe.'

This is getting a little weird.
We all have mental illness iof some sort. When I say Donald Trump has a mental disorder called narcissism, I am not making fun. I’m not saying
, ‘Wacko Donny” for instance. I have empathy for the man. This is why I’ve often stated that I feel sorry for
the man. Just tonight, I saw an interview with Howard Stern and he stated that he has inside knowledge that Trump never intended to be president. It all started as a publicity stunt to sell his book. Even the media ran with it because it was good theater for ratings. No one thought this man would ever become president because he did everything that would spell doom for any other candidate. Once it began steamrolling, as Stern said, Trump had no choice but to fight because he cannot stand losing. Stern is convinced that Trump rues the day that he became president, but his mental disorder will not allow him to bow out.

This is a phenomena of extraordinary significance. A man, who began his office seeking as a publicity stunt to bolster his book and TV ratings, became President of the most powerful country on earth. You couldn’t dream this stuff up if you had to.

I feel sorry for the man because he truly can’t help himself, but I have to point out the obvious because this country is in peril.

learnin
Moderator
Posts: 12505
Joined: September 18th, 2013, 1:41 pm
Has thanked: 7 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Post by learnin » August 2nd, 2020, 2:59 am

pulitzerdave wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 10:42 pm
stlcatfan wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 9:43 am
This is pretty rich coming from a Joe Biden supporter. Biden is mentally deteriorating before our eyes, or at least we see it when he comes out of his basement. It used to be a joke with Biden and all of his gaffes, but it has become a serious issue, I think. He is even at the point where he forgets where he is at, and then he tries to cover it up by saying, "Ah, it was a joke. I'm just kidding." Uh huh.
Ya just gotta pity the guy (trump). I don't think he ever wanted to be president. He just wanted the attention, and a way to promote his brand. He's so over his head!
Pdave, you are absolutely right. Don did not want the presidency as his close friend Howard Stern has said on multiple occasions. This was a guy who practically worshipped Hillary Clinton before he saw politics as a means to promote himself.

spot2180
Posts: 6710
Joined: November 12th, 2017, 10:32 am
Has thanked: 42 times
Been thanked: 24 times

Post by spot2180 » August 2nd, 2020, 6:17 am

pulitzerdave wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 11:23 pm
spot2180 wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 6:12 pm


It isn't rocket science to figure out how feel about the man, xtra. You prove it right there in that post.

I am pretty sure we'll find out that Russian bounties started during Obama's presidency. The first news about it was in April of 2017, four months into Trump's presidency, so if that is when they first got wind of it, it was likely happening for a time before that.

What it must be like waking up every morning looking for negative articles to post because you hate someone.
Again, you just don't get it. People are writing articles based on what trump is saying and doing (or not doing, in the case of the bounties). trump is a disgrace to the office of the presidency. Most Americans now do not approve of him. And you're taking shots at a few posters on this forum? Wake up! Look around. Get out of your trump bubble and see what is happening. There are tens of millions of Americans who don't want this guy to lead this country. Are they all wrong, and you are the one with the infinite wisdom about this loser? I DON'T THINK SO!
I get it just fine, dave. People were writing FALSE articles based on BS claims (and pulitzer prizes given for those fasle articles) and a made up dossier on things Trump NEVER did for 3 years. I'd say after three years, most people get THAT, but for some reason you still believe in that heap o' dung. FBI document after FBI document has proven that Trump didn't do what you and others said he did. The real disgrace to the office of POTUS happened with an outgoing president that felt that he needed to spy on a political opponent with no real predication. That should have never happened, but it did, dave. And after he won, those loyal to that outgoing POTUS continued to spy, with a compliant media, to oust a duly elected president. And you were just fine with it, weren't you? .

And I don't think you have any idea of what most Americans approve of. No one has a thicker bubble than you, kid. The American people don't approve of riots and disbanding/defunding/ dismantling law enforcement. They don't approve of damaging people's businesses and tearing down statues. They don't approve of the carnage and democrat systemic racism happening in our large democrat run inner cities and they don't approve of the carnage of sharp objects pushed into the back of babies heads so their brains can be vaccuumed out. They don't approve of open borders and human smuggling. They don't approve of illegals voting. They don't approve of medicare for all.They don't approve of free college tuition. And that is just getting started. And they don't approve of some laws applying to some but not to others.

Taking shots at people on this forum nearly every day, is what you do, dave. No one on the board is better at it. :rofl: :rofl:
trump is a disgrace to the office of the presidency. Most Americans now do not approve of him....and you are the one with the infinite wisdom about this loser?


Different words, but it doesn't get any more high school than that. None of the other stuff was true, so you pivot to personality to attack him. What are they serving in the cafeteria today?

What's it like to wake up every morning deciding to hate someone?
These users thanked the author spot2180 for the post:
stlcatfan
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." ~ Aldous Huxley
"Socialism in general has a record of failure so blatant that only an intellectual could ignore or evade it." - Thomas Sowell

spot2180
Posts: 6710
Joined: November 12th, 2017, 10:32 am
Has thanked: 42 times
Been thanked: 24 times

Post by spot2180 » August 2nd, 2020, 8:53 am

pulitzerdave wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 11:23 pm

Again, you just don't get it.... Most Americans now do not approve of him. And you're taking shots at a few posters on this forum? Wake up! Look around. Get out of your trump bubble and see what is happening. There are tens of millions of Americans who don't want this guy to lead this country....
This happened in NY of all places. I think it says 'get out of your bubble, dave.'

https://www.lifezette.com/2020/08/angry ... backfires/

"After seeing the calls for a boycott and the reasoning behind it, Patio Pizza was flooded with patriotic, Trump supporting customers who overwhelmed the business with support."
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." ~ Aldous Huxley
"Socialism in general has a record of failure so blatant that only an intellectual could ignore or evade it." - Thomas Sowell

ToledoCat#3
Posts: 1055
Joined: March 22nd, 2020, 10:37 am
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 30 times

Post by ToledoCat#3 » August 2nd, 2020, 8:58 am

I'd much prefer to deal with a mental case like Trump, than a mental case like the person with the pulitizer words. In comparison, IMHO, Trump appears to be the more stable and rational, and certainly more pro-America.

katlander
Posts: 5486
Joined: June 3rd, 2015, 12:44 pm
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 13 times

Post by katlander » August 2nd, 2020, 9:36 am

pulitzerdave wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 8:32 am
In another time, in a different circumstance, there would perhaps be room to pity such a person.
JULY 21, 2020
Peter Wehner
Contributing writer at The Atlantic and senior fellow at EPPC

The most revealing answer from Donald Trump’s interview with Fox News Channel’s Chris Wallace came in response not to the toughest question posed by Wallace, but to the easiest.
At the conclusion of the interview, Wallace asked Trump how he will regard his years as president.

“I think I was very unfairly treated,” Trump responded. “From before I even won, I was under investigation by a bunch of thieves, crooks. It was an illegal investigation.”

The president is unraveling
When Wallace interrupted, trying to get Trump to focus on the positive achievements of his presidency—“What about the good parts, sir?”—Trump brushed the question aside, responding, “Russia, Russia, Russia.” The president then complained about the Flynn investigation, the “Russia hoax,” the “Mueller scam,” and the recusal by his then–attorney general, Jeff Sessions. (“Now I feel good because he lost overwhelmingly in the great state of Alabama,” Trump said about the first senator to endorse him in the 2016 Republican primary.)
Donald Trump is a psychologically broken, embittered, and deeply unhappy man. He is so gripped by his grievances, such a prisoner of his resentments, that even the most benevolent question from an interviewer—what good parts of your presidency would you like to be remembered for?—triggered a gusher of discontent.

But the president still wasn’t done. “Here’s the bottom line,” he said. “I’ve been very unfairly treated, and I don’t say that as paranoid. I’ve been very—everybody says it. It’s going to be interesting to see what happens. But there was tremendous evidence right now as to how unfairly treated I was. President Obama and Biden spied on my campaign. It’s never happened in history. If it were the other way around, the people would be in jail for 50 years right now.”
David Frum: This is Trump’s plague now
Just in case his bitterness wasn’t coming through clearly enough, the president added this: “That would be Comey, that would be Brennan, that would be all of this—the two lovers, Strzok and Page, they would be in jail now for many, many years. They would be in jail; it would’ve started two years ago, and they’d be there for 50 years. The fact is, they illegally spied on my campaign. Let’s see what happens. Despite that, I did more than any president in history in the first three and a half years.”

With that, the interview ended.
Such a disposition in almost anyone else—a teacher, a tax accountant, a CEO, a cab driver, a reality-television star—would be unfortunate enough. After all, people who obsess about being wronged are just plain unpleasant to be around: perpetually ungrateful, short-tempered, self-absorbed, never at peace, never at rest.
But Donald Trump isn’t a teacher, a tax accountant, or (any longer) a reality-television star; he is, by virtue of the office he holds, in possession of unmatched power. The fact that he is devoid of any moral sensibilities or admirable human qualities—self-discipline, compassion, empathy, responsibility, courage, honesty, loyalty, prudence, temperance, a desire for justice—means he has no internal moral check; the question Is this the right thing to do? never enters his mind. As a result, he not only nurses his grievances; he acts on them. He lives to exact revenge, to watch his opponents suffer, to inflict pain on those who don’t bend before him. Even former war heroes who have died can’t escape his wrath.

So Donald Trump is a vindictive man who also happens to be commander in chief and head of the executive branch, which includes the Justice Department, and there is no one around the president who will stand up to him. He has surrounded himself with lapdogs.
But the problem doesn’t end there. In a single term, Trump has reshaped the Republican Party through and through, and his dispositional imprint on the GOP is as great as any in modern history, including Ronald Reagan’s.
I say that as a person who was deeply shaped by Reagan and his presidency. My first job in government was working for the Reagan administration, when I was in my 20s. The conservative movement in the 1980s, although hardly flawless, was intellectually serious and politically optimistic. And Reagan himself was a man of personal decency, grace, and class. While often the target of nasty attacks, he maintained a remarkably charitable view of his political adversaries. “Remember, we have no enemies, only opponents,” the former Indiana governor Mitch Daniels, who worked for Reagan, quotes him as admonishing his staff.

In his farewell address to the nation, Reagan offered an evocative description of America. “I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it,” he said. “But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, wind-swept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.”
A city tall and proud, its people living in harmony and peace, surrounded by walls with open doors; that was Ronald Reagan’s image of America, and Ronald Reagan’s Republican Party.
When Reagan died in 2004, the conservative columnist George Will wrote a moving tribute to his friend, saying of America’s 40th president, “He traveled far, had a grand time all the way, and his cheerfulness was contagious.” Reagan had a “talent for happiness,” according to Will. And he added this: “Reagan in his presidential role made vivid the values, particularly hopefulness and friendliness, that give cohesion and dynamism to this continental nation.”

There were certainly ugly elements on the American right during the Reagan presidency, and Reagan himself was not without flaws. But as president, he set the tone, and the tone was optimism, courtliness and elegance, joie de vivre.
He has since been replaced by the crudest and cruelest man ever to be president. But not just that. One senses in Donald Trump no joy, no delight, no laughter. All the emotions that drive him are negative. There is something repugnant about Trump, yes, but there is also something quite sad about the man. He is a damaged soul. The cruelty is the point.

In another time, in a different circumstance, there would perhaps be room to pity such a person. But for now, it is best for the pity to wait. There are other things to which to attend. The American public faces one great and morally urgent task above all others between now and November: to do everything in its power to remove from the presidency a self-pitying man who is shattering the nation and doesn’t even care.

This article is a contradiction of itself. It is just one more of thousands of attack articles that prove that what President Trump contends is exactly right. History will very likely look at his Presidency as one where much was accomplished in the face of unrelenting and criminal attack, and virtually no cooperation from the opposition. The craziness included criminal investigation by the opposition President during the campaign, riots when he was elected, a false impeachment, more protests, riots, burning, vandalism and looting now, possibly an attack of biological warfare, and a myriad of other deviant behavior to undermine a duly elected President. A corrupt media and bureaucracy were complicit all the way. Constant lies and misrepresentations from these participants of the left. Despite all President Trump has done more in a short time than the three presidents before him accomplished in 6 terms over 24 years. That is the story of 45.

User avatar
WIldWIllieCat
Posts: 19860
Joined: September 7th, 2013, 7:30 am
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 32 times

Post by WIldWIllieCat » August 2nd, 2020, 9:49 am

Ryan's trickle down tax cuts.
McConnell's judges.
Trump's circus.
"The peculiar office of a demagogue is to advance his own interests, by affecting a deep devotion to the interests of the people. .”

spot2180
Posts: 6710
Joined: November 12th, 2017, 10:32 am
Has thanked: 42 times
Been thanked: 24 times

Post by spot2180 » August 2nd, 2020, 10:13 am

WIldWIllieCat wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 9:49 am
Ryan's trickle down tax cuts.
McConnell's judges.
Trump's circus.
You blame Trump for the circus? That's a laugh. Oh he does dumb tweets and stirs things up when he doesn't need to once in a while, but most of the so-called circus you blame on him was perpetrated by democrats throwing tantrums be cause the most corrupt politician in a centruy didn't get elected.

He didn't start the unpredicated spying operation on his campaign.
He didn't illegally leak information that started the 'special investigation' that was the Mueller farce.
He didn't collect a garbage dossier for Hillary and the DNC.
He didn't turn the Kavanaugh hearing into an avalanche of unproveable allegations.
He didn't tell Adam Schiff create a quid pro quo where there was none.
He did nothing to warrant that impeachment farce.
He didn't create covid. He probably could have acted sooner, but the impeachment farce had his attention, and when that was over, Pelosi was inviting people down to China Town.

There are some things I have forgotten, but you get the idea. I know you do. Wishful thinking on your part is the take away, as far as circuses go.
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." ~ Aldous Huxley
"Socialism in general has a record of failure so blatant that only an intellectual could ignore or evade it." - Thomas Sowell

User avatar
JazzCatDRP
Administrator
Posts: 7119
Joined: August 25th, 2013, 11:32 pm
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 8 times

Post by JazzCatDRP » August 2nd, 2020, 10:41 am

RichardZ wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 6:40 pm
So, let me get this straight....

Someone can say the president has a 'disordered brain' and the president has a 'mental illness', but cannot say, without reprimand,..... 'Dementia Joe.'

This is getting a little weird.

The "silly nickname" rule has been discussed ad nauseam -- it's not new. I have no problem with discussing the mental state of Joe Biden or Donald Trump, and there are plenty of examples of it on this board. But nicknames like "Dementia Joe Biden" or tRump" do nothing to further reasonable discussion and are just intended to rile up the other side and start a fight. That's what the Warzone is for.

This thread is obviously heading to the WZ now -- I'm not going to issue warnings for this thread as the whole thing is off the rails. Consider it a mulligan, lol.

Just a friendly reminder, if you're sitting there with two warnings, the next step is a one week timeout from G&G.

User avatar
purpleprairiecat
Posts: 2147
Joined: May 18th, 2014, 1:16 pm
Location: Manhattan, KS
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 0

Post by purpleprairiecat » August 2nd, 2020, 12:00 pm

I agree with the assessment of Trump in this thread by pulitzerdave and learnin. I know their assessment is difficult to swallow for the Trump supporters, but it is accurate. The US is in a downward spiral because of Trump's lack of leadership. He is totally unfit to serve as President. I also believe he is a traitor and will do everything possible to stay in power. We are in very troubling times where our democracy is threatened. Trump represents a authoritarian movement that everyone should be concerned about.

I thought about starting a separate thread in The War Zone based on the following article where a British writer describes the shortcomings of Trump:

https://londondaily.com/british-writer- ... YMD39lnudY

However, this article fits well with the direction this thread is going about Trump's many deficiencies. Here is the text of the article:

British Writer Pens The Best Description Of Trump I’ve Read

Nate White

“Why do some British people not like Donald Trump?” Nate White, an articulate and witty writer from England wrote the following response:
A few things spring to mind. Trump lacks certain qualities which the British traditionally esteem. For instance, he has no class, no charm, no coolness, no credibility, no compassion, no wit, no warmth, no wisdom, no subtlety, no sensitivity, no self-awareness, no humility, no honour and no grace – all qualities, funnily enough, with which his predecessor Mr. Obama was generously blessed. So for us, the stark contrast does rather throw Trump’s limitations into embarrassingly sharp relief.

Plus, we like a laugh. And while Trump may be laughable, he has never once said anything wry, witty or even faintly amusing – not once, ever. I don’t say that rhetorically, I mean it quite literally: not once, not ever. And that fact is particularly disturbing to the British sensibility – for us, to lack humour is almost inhuman. But with Trump, it’s a fact. He doesn’t even seem to understand what a joke is – his idea of a joke is a crass comment, an illiterate insult, a casual act of cruelty.

Trump is a troll. And like all trolls, he is never funny and he never laughs; he only crows or jeers. And scarily, he doesn’t just talk in crude, witless insults – he actually thinks in them. His mind is a simple bot-like algorithm of petty prejudices and knee-jerk nastiness.

There is never any under-layer of irony, complexity, nuance or depth. It’s all surface. Some Americans might see this as refreshingly upfront. Well, we don’t. We see it as having no inner world, no soul. And in Britain we traditionally side with David, not Goliath. All our heroes are plucky underdogs: Robin Hood, Dick Whittington, Oliver Twist. Trump is neither plucky, nor an underdog. He is the exact opposite of that. He’s not even a spoiled rich-boy, or a greedy fat-cat. He’s more a fat white slug. A Jabba the Hutt of privilege.

And worse, he is that most unforgivable of all things to the British: a bully. That is, except when he is among bullies; then he suddenly transforms into a snivelling sidekick instead. There are unspoken rules to this stuff – the Queensberry rules of basic decency – and he breaks them all. He punches downwards – which a gentleman should, would, could never do – and every blow he aims is below the belt. He particularly likes to kick the vulnerable or voiceless – and he kicks them when they are down.

So the fact that a significant minority – perhaps a third – of Americans look at what he does, listen to what he says, and then think ‘Yeah, he seems like my kind of guy’ is a matter of some confusion and no little distress to British people, given that:

• Americans are supposed to be nicer than us, and mostly are.

• You don’t need a particularly keen eye for detail to spot a few flaws in the man.

This last point is what especially confuses and dismays British people, and many other people too; his faults seem pretty bloody hard to miss. After all, it’s impossible to read a single tweet, or hear him speak a sentence or two, without staring deep into the abyss. He turns being artless into an art form; he is a Picasso of pettiness; a Shakespeare of shit. His faults are fractal: even his flaws have flaws, and so on ad infinitum. God knows there have always been stupid people in the world, and plenty of nasty people too. But rarely has stupidity been so nasty, or nastiness so stupid. He makes Nixon look trustworthy and George W look smart. In fact, if Frankenstein decided to make a monster assembled entirely from human flaws – he would make a Trump.

And a remorseful Doctor Frankenstein would clutch out big clumpfuls of hair and scream in anguish: ‘My God… what… have… I… created?' If being a twat was a TV show, Trump would be the boxed set.

Post Reply